Forget neoprene and gortex - just dress me up for winter in whatever an American Dipper wears! Waterproof & coldproof in our wet, wind and snow. pic.twitter.com/IOoILgHeyd Retweeted by Fiera Biological

We are excited to announce the 2021 #WorldWetlandsDay online conference in partnership with @COSIA_ca and #NAWMP partners. Join us at 8:30am (MST) on Feb 2, 2021, to engage with our lineup of outstanding speakers. Register for free at mru.ca/wetlands pic.twitter.com/S59qQ8XOsP Retweeted by Fiera Biological

Camera Trapping

Camera trapping refers to the use of remote game cameras to study wildlife. This remote monitoring approach can tell us a lot about the diversity, movement patterns, habitat use, and abundance of wildlife in remote locations or over long periods of time, at relatively low cost.

Although the wide-spread use of camera trapping is relatively new to wildlife research, management, and monitoring, the technology is not new to Fiera. Our experience with camera trapping goes back more than 16 years, to before the cameras were digital, to when each camera had only a 36 picture capacity!

Camera trapping, camera trap, marked recapture, wildlife monitoring, wildlife inventory, wildlife study, impact assessment, occupancy,
Mountain goats captured on an analogue 36 picture capacity game camera, circa 2002. Credit: Shari Clare, Fiera Biological

As a result of Fiera Biological’s long history with camera traps, we have loads of experience deploying and managing camera traps for a wide range of species and study objectives. From monitoring changes in trail use by mountain goats due to forest harvest, to assessing the movement of wildlife in urban corridors to inform development design, to before and after development monitoring in sensitive habitats in the shadow of Oilsands development, to province-wide systematic sampling for biodiversity, our team has done it all.

Does your project require large-scale, long term wildlife monitoring? Get in touch to learn how we can help.

Enjoy the photos below, which were all captured using remote camera technology:

Camera trapping, camera trap, marked recapture, wildlife monitoring, wildlife inventory, wildlife study, impact assessment, occupancy,
Woodland Caribou
Camera trapping, camera trap, marked recapture, wildlife monitoring, wildlife inventory, wildlife study, impact assessment, occupancy,
American Marten
Camera trapping, camera trap, marked recapture, wildlife monitoring, wildlife inventory, wildlife study, impact assessment, occupancy,
River Otter
Camera trapping, camera trap, marked recapture, wildlife monitoring, wildlife inventory, wildlife study, impact assessment, occupancy,
Sandhill Crane